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5:42 AM 4/14/2019 – The Russians are hacking the global navigation satellite system (GNSS) on a mass scale…

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RUSSIA and THE WEST – РОССИЯ и ЗАПАД: 5:25 AM 4/14/2019 – The Russians are hacking the global navigation satellite system (GNSS) on a mass scale in order to confuse thousands of ships and airplanes about where they are

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5:25 AM 4/14/2019 – The Russians are hacking the global navigation satellite system (GNSS) on a mass scale in order to confuse thousands of ships and airplanes about where they are…

putin kerch
 Alexander Nemenov/Pool via REUTERS

  • The Russians are hacking the global navigation satellite system (GNSS) on a mass scale in order to confuse thousands of ships and airplanes about where they are, according to a study by Centre for Advanced Defense (C4AD).

Google Maps / VMorozoff – Wikimapia, CC

The Russians are screwing with the GPS system – Google Search

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Story image for The Russians are screwing with the GPS system from Business Insider

The Russians are screwing with the GPS system to send bogus …

Business Insider2 hours ago
The Russians are hacking the global navigation satellite system (GNSS) on a mass scale in order to confuse thousands of ships and airplanes about where they …
Story image for The Russians are screwing with the GPS system from CIMSEC

Operation Eminent Shield: The Advent of Unmanned Distributed …

CIMSECApr 9, 2019
… and how continued Russian micronaval advances, most notably the nuclear-armed … especially when it came to unmanned systems and what was then being …. in a while penetrate the Strikepod perimeter and foul the screws pretty good. …. We’d use onboard EW effectors to spoof their GPS and AIS.
Story image for The Russians are screwing with the GPS system from NBCNews.com

NBCNews.com

Rep. Harris: “Ridiculous Amount” of Time/Money Wasted on Special …

The DaggerMar 26, 2019
What we have just witnessed is that the American Justice System is in itself an act of treason …. Don Jr said Russia provides all the money they need …… Why did fusion gps, the media spin squad hired by Hillary, meet with Veselnitskaya both ….. Yea but real clear investigations screwed the pooch on facts.
Story image for The Russians are screwing with the GPS system from The Register

Fun fact: GPS uses 10 bits to store the week. That means it runs out …

The RegisterFeb 12, 2019
Older satnavs and such devices won’t be able to use America’s Global Positioning System properly after April 6 unless they’ve been suitably …
Story image for The Russians are screwing with the GPS system from Washington Post

Chatological Humor (Apr. 2)

Washington PostMar 29, 2019
Everybody should just use Waze or a similar GPS app. …. I think if the Russians were seriously trying to collude with the dopes, they’d have colluded with the dopes. … in our electoral system and seriously compromising President McCheese. … If you recall, the exit polling in 2004 was seriously screwed up.
Story image for The Russians are screwing with the GPS system from The New Yorker

How Bill Browder Became Russia’s Most Wanted Man

The New YorkerAug 13, 2018
In exchange, Putin explained to the gathered press, Russian ….. “It screws up his social contract with those inside the system,” she said. … In spring, 2014, Katsyv’s defense team hired Glenn Simpson, of Fusion GPS, a private …
Read the whole story
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Russians hacking the GPS system to send ships bogus GNSS navigation data

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On May 15, 2018, under a sunny sky, Russian President Vladimir Putin drove a bright orange truck in a convoy of construction vehicles for the opening of the Kerch Bridge from Russia to Crimea. At 11 miles long, it is now the longest bridge in either Europe or Russia.
As Putin drove across the bridge, something weird happened. The satellite navigation systems in the control rooms of more than 24 ships anchored nearby suddenly started displaying false information about their location. Their GPS systems told their captains they were anchored more than 65 kilometres away — on land, at the Anapa Airport.
This was not a random glitch, according to the Centre for Advanced Defense, a security think tank. It was a deliberate plan to make it difficult for anyone nearby to track or navigate around the presence of Putin, C4AD says.

“All critical national infrastructures rely on GNSS to some extent” — and the Russians have started hacking it

The Russians have started hacking into the global navigation satellite system (GNSS) on a mass scale in order to confuse thousands of ships and airplanes about where they are, according to a study of false GNSS signals by C4AD.
GNSS comprises the constellation of international satellites that orbit the earth. The US’s Global Positioning System (GPS), China’s Beidou, Russia’s GLONASS, and Europe’s Galileo program are all part of GNSS.
Your phone, law enforcement, shipping, airlines, and power stations — anything dependent on GPS time and location synchronization — are all vulnerable to GNSS hacking. “All critical national infrastructures rely on GNSS to some extent, with Communications, Emergency Services, Finance, and Transport identified as particularly intensive users,” according to a report commissioned by the UK Space Agency. An attack that disabled GNSS in Britain would cost about £1 billion every day the system was down, the report said.
The jamming, blocking, or spoofing of GNSS signals by the Russian government is “more indiscriminate and persistent, larger in scope, and more geographically diverse than previous public reporting suggested,” according to the Weekly Intelligence Summary from Digital Shadows, a cyber security monitoring service.

Nearly 10,000 incidents of ships being sent bad location data

The C4AD study says:
  • 1,311 civilian ships have been affected.
  • 9,883 incidents were reported or detected.
Until the last couple of years, C4AD believed the Russians used GNSS jamming or spoofing mostly to disguise the whereabouts of President Putin.
For instance, a large area over Cape Idokopas, near Gelendzhik on the Black Sea coast of Russia, appears to be within a permanent GNSS spoofing zone. The cape is believed to be Putin’s summer home, or dacha. It contains a vast and lavish private residence: “a large Italianate palace, several helicopter pads, an amphitheatre, and a small port,” C4AD says. It is the only private home in Russia that enjoys the same level of airspace protection and GNSS interference as the Kremlin.

“Russian forces had developed mobile GNSS jamming units to provide protection for the Russian president”

“The geographical placement of the spoofing incidents closely aligns with places where Vladimir Putin was making overseas and domestic visits, suggesting that Russian forces had developed mobile GNSS jamming units to provide protection for the Russian president. The incidents also align with the locations of Russian military and government resources. Although in some areas the motive was likely to restrict access to or obstruct foreign military,” according to Digital Shadows.
Ships sailing near Gelendzhik have reported receiving bogus navigation data on their satellite systems. “In June 2017, the captain of the merchant vessel Atria provided direct evidence of GNSS spoofing activities off the coast of Gelendzhik, Russia, when the vessel’s on-board navigation systems indicated it was located in the middle of the Gelendzhik Airport, about 20km away. More than two dozen other vessels reported similar disruptions in the region on that day,” C4AD says.

An $80 million superyacht was sent off-course by a device the size of a briefcase

Most of the incidents have been recorded in Crimea, the Black Sea, Syria, and Russia.
Perhaps more disturbingly, GNSS spoofing equipment is available to almost anyone, for just a few hundred dollars.
“In the summer of 2013, a research team from The University of Texas at Austin (UT) successfully hijacked the GPS navigation systems onboard an $80 million superyacht using a $2,000 device the size of a small briefcase. The experimental attack forced the ship’s navigation systems to relay false positioning information to the vessel’s captain, who subsequently made slight course corrections to keep the ship seemingly on track,” C4AD reported.
Since then the cost of a GNSS spoofing device has fallen to about $300, C4AD says, and some people have been using them to cheat at Pokemon Go.
Read the whole story
· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·
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4:41 AM 4/14/2019 – Editorial: Looking into surveillance – Opinion – providencejournal.com Sunday April 14th, 2019 at 5:38 AM

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Editorial: Looking into surveillance – Opinion – providencejournal.com – Sunday April 14th, 2019 at 5:38 AM

Editorial: Looking into surveillance – Opinion – providencejournal.com

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The bitter partisanship that dominates Washington erupted again last week after Attorney General William Barr told a Senate panel that he thought “spying did occur” on Donald Trump’s presidential campaign and that he is looking into the matter.
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi accused him of putting his devotion to the president above his loyalty to the nation. Senator Minority Leader Chuck Schumer demanded that Mr. Barr “retract his statement immediately,” arguing, “Perpetuating conspiracy theories is beneath the office of the attorney general.”
Sen. Brian Schatz, D-Hawaii, said that Mr. Barr’s comment was “unnecessarily inflammatory” and “could cause everybody in the cable news ecosystem to freak out.” The Washington Post accused him of mouthing President Trump’s “talking points.”
The level of distrust seems to be off the charts.
But perhaps we can all step back, take a deep breath and agree on one thing: the protections of individual liberty built into the Constitution and its Bill of Rights are a good thing. If our government has improperly used its immense power to spy on citizens for political purposes, it is vital that it be stopped, and those involved be punished, lest we become a police state.
That’s a big “if,” of course, as the attorney general made clear in his testimony.
“I am not saying improper surveillance occurred. I am saying I am concerned about it, and I am looking into it,” he said.
“Yes, I think spying did occur. The question is whether it was adequately predicated” — meaning, whether top Obama intelligence officials were legally justified in surveilling the communications and activities of members of the presidential campaign of the opposing party. For obvious reasons, the government’s intelligence agencies are not supposed to cross that bright red line causally.
“I think spying on a political campaign is a big deal,” Mr. Barr said. “I feel that I have an obligation to ensure government power was not abused.”
He is waiting for the Justice Department inspector general, Michael Horowitz, to report on the use of warrants issued by a secret court for the investigations.
We view President Trump with immense skepticism and consider his bad policies, mercurial behavior and freewheeling pronouncements to be damaging to the nation and demeaning to his high office. We proudly endorsed his opponent, Hillary Clinton.
All the same, it is unnerving that former leading intelligence officials who should scrupulously stand above politics have been bitterly partisan in their texts, tweets, books and cable TV gigs. Given the immense powers of the government to probe citizens, particularly in the digital age, it is absolutely essential that our intelligence agencies not be weaponized for political use.
Though a big GOP campaign contributor, Mr. Barr does not seem to be an obvious hothead. A well-off 68-year-old with round glasses and a deadpan expression, he has long been regarded as a careful lawyer and a member in good standing of the Washington establishment, having formerly served as attorney general under President George H.W. Bush.
Whether he will fairly explore what led to government surveillance of members of his boss’s campaign team remains to be seen.
But certainly this matter is something that the country’s top justice official should look into, whether that affects the ecosystem of cable news or not.
Read the whole story
· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·

Unredacted report needed

1 Share
Meanwhile, Trump’s claiming, based on Barr’s summary, that he is … So is phoning Putin’s buddy, al Bashir, to warn him that we were going to bomb …

OP-ED: Mueller Report likely won’t flatter Trump

1 Share
After Trump fired FBI Director James Comey over “this Russia thing,” Rosenstein appointed Robert Mueller, a lifelong Republican and a man with an …

“Rudy Giuliani” – Google News: Terrorist label is a convenient pretext for military intervention – Frederick News Post

1 Share
Terrorist label is a convenient pretext for military intervention  Frederick News Post

For the first time in history, the United States has designated a military unit of a foreign country as a terrorist group.

 “Rudy Giuliani” – Google News

“trump electorate” – Google News: Editorial: Release Trump’s tax returns | News, Sports, Jobs – Lawrence Journal-World

1 Share
Editorial: Release Trump’s tax returns | News, Sports, Jobs  Lawrence Journal-World

Republicans may be right that efforts by Congressional Democrats to force the release of President Donald Trump’s tax returns may open a big can of worms.

 “trump electorate” – Google News

Read the whole story
· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·

surveillance – Google Search

1 Share
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Editorial: Looking into surveillance – Opinion – providencejournal.com

1 Share
The bitter partisanship that dominates Washington erupted again last week after Attorney General William Barr told a Senate panel that he thought “spying did occur” on Donald Trump’s presidential campaign and that he is looking into the matter.
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi accused him of putting his devotion to the president above his loyalty to the nation. Senator Minority Leader Chuck Schumer demanded that Mr. Barr “retract his statement immediately,” arguing, “Perpetuating conspiracy theories is beneath the office of the attorney general.”
Sen. Brian Schatz, D-Hawaii, said that Mr. Barr’s comment was “unnecessarily inflammatory” and “could cause everybody in the cable news ecosystem to freak out.” The Washington Post accused him of mouthing President Trump’s “talking points.”
The level of distrust seems to be off the charts.
But perhaps we can all step back, take a deep breath and agree on one thing: the protections of individual liberty built into the Constitution and its Bill of Rights are a good thing. If our government has improperly used its immense power to spy on citizens for political purposes, it is vital that it be stopped, and those involved be punished, lest we become a police state.
That’s a big “if,” of course, as the attorney general made clear in his testimony.
“I am not saying improper surveillance occurred. I am saying I am concerned about it, and I am looking into it,” he said.
“Yes, I think spying did occur. The question is whether it was adequately predicated” — meaning, whether top Obama intelligence officials were legally justified in surveilling the communications and activities of members of the presidential campaign of the opposing party. For obvious reasons, the government’s intelligence agencies are not supposed to cross that bright red line causally.
“I think spying on a political campaign is a big deal,” Mr. Barr said. “I feel that I have an obligation to ensure government power was not abused.”
He is waiting for the Justice Department inspector general, Michael Horowitz, to report on the use of warrants issued by a secret court for the investigations.
We view President Trump with immense skepticism and consider his bad policies, mercurial behavior and freewheeling pronouncements to be damaging to the nation and demeaning to his high office. We proudly endorsed his opponent, Hillary Clinton.
All the same, it is unnerving that former leading intelligence officials who should scrupulously stand above politics have been bitterly partisan in their texts, tweets, books and cable TV gigs. Given the immense powers of the government to probe citizens, particularly in the digital age, it is absolutely essential that our intelligence agencies not be weaponized for political use.
Though a big GOP campaign contributor, Mr. Barr does not seem to be an obvious hothead. A well-off 68-year-old with round glasses and a deadpan expression, he has long been regarded as a careful lawyer and a member in good standing of the Washington establishment, having formerly served as attorney general under President George H.W. Bush.
Whether he will fairly explore what led to government surveillance of members of his boss’s campaign team remains to be seen.
But certainly this matter is something that the country’s top justice official should look into, whether that affects the ecosystem of cable news or not.
Read the whole story
· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·

Unredacted report needed

1 Share
Meanwhile, Trump’s claiming, based on Barr’s summary, that he is … So is phoning Putin’s buddy, al Bashir, to warn him that we were going to bomb …

OP-ED: Mueller Report likely won’t flatter Trump

1 Share
After Trump fired FBI Director James Comey over “this Russia thing,” Rosenstein appointed Robert Mueller, a lifelong Republican and a man with an …

“Rudy Giuliani” – Google News: Terrorist label is a convenient pretext for military intervention – Frederick News Post

1 Share
Terrorist label is a convenient pretext for military intervention  Frederick News Post

For the first time in history, the United States has designated a military unit of a foreign country as a terrorist group.

 “Rudy Giuliani” – Google News

Read the whole story
· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·

The Russians are screwing with the GPS system – Google Search

1 Share
Story image for The Russians are screwing with the GPS system from Business Insider

The Russians are screwing with the GPS system to send bogus …

Business Insider2 hours ago
The Russians are hacking the global navigation satellite system (GNSS) on a mass scale in order to confuse thousands of ships and airplanes about where they …
Story image for The Russians are screwing with the GPS system from CIMSEC

Operation Eminent Shield: The Advent of Unmanned Distributed …

CIMSECApr 9, 2019
… and how continued Russian micronaval advances, most notably the nuclear-armed … especially when it came to unmanned systems and what was then being …. in a while penetrate the Strikepod perimeter and foul the screws pretty good. …. We’d use onboard EW effectors to spoof their GPS and AIS.
Story image for The Russians are screwing with the GPS system from NBCNews.com

NBCNews.com

Rep. Harris: “Ridiculous Amount” of Time/Money Wasted on Special …

The DaggerMar 26, 2019
What we have just witnessed is that the American Justice System is in itself an act of treason …. Don Jr said Russia provides all the money they need …… Why did fusion gps, the media spin squad hired by Hillary, meet with Veselnitskaya both ….. Yea but real clear investigations screwed the pooch on facts.
Story image for The Russians are screwing with the GPS system from The Register

Fun fact: GPS uses 10 bits to store the week. That means it runs out …

The RegisterFeb 12, 2019
Older satnavs and such devices won’t be able to use America’s Global Positioning System properly after April 6 unless they’ve been suitably …
Story image for The Russians are screwing with the GPS system from Washington Post

Chatological Humor (Apr. 2)

Washington PostMar 29, 2019
Everybody should just use Waze or a similar GPS app. …. I think if the Russians were seriously trying to collude with the dopes, they’d have colluded with the dopes. … in our electoral system and seriously compromising President McCheese. … If you recall, the exit polling in 2004 was seriously screwed up.
Story image for The Russians are screwing with the GPS system from The New Yorker

How Bill Browder Became Russia’s Most Wanted Man

The New YorkerAug 13, 2018
In exchange, Putin explained to the gathered press, Russian ….. “It screws up his social contract with those inside the system,” she said. … In spring, 2014, Katsyv’s defense team hired Glenn Simpson, of Fusion GPS, a private …
Read the whole story
· · ·

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The Russians are screwing with the GPS system – Google Search

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Russians hacking the GPS system to send ships bogus GNSS navigation data

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On May 15, 2018, under a sunny sky, Russian President Vladimir Putin drove a bright orange truck in a convoy of construction vehicles for the opening of the Kerch Bridge from Russia to Crimea. At 11 miles long, it is now the longest bridge in either Europe or Russia.

As Putin drove across the bridge, something weird happened. The satellite navigation systems in the control rooms of more than 24 ships anchored nearby suddenly started displaying false information about their location. Their GPS systems told their captains they were anchored more than 65 kilometres away — on land, at the Anapa Airport.

This was not a random glitch, according to the Centre for Advanced Defense, a security think tank. It was a deliberate plan to make it difficult for anyone nearby to track or navigate around the presence of Putin, C4AD says.

“All critical national infrastructures rely on GNSS to some extent” — and the Russians have started hacking it

The Russians have started hacking into the global navigation satellite system (GNSS) on a mass scale in order to confuse thousands of ships and airplanes about where they are, according to a study of false GNSS signals by C4AD.

GNSS comprises the constellation of international satellites that orbit the earth. The US’s Global Positioning System (GPS), China’s Beidou, Russia’s GLONASS, and Europe’s Galileo program are all part of GNSS.

Your phone, law enforcement, shipping, airlines, and power stations — anything dependent on GPS time and location synchronization — are all vulnerable to GNSS hacking. “All critical national infrastructures rely on GNSS to some extent, with Communications, Emergency Services, Finance, and Transport identified as particularly intensive users,” according to a report commissioned by the UK Space Agency. An attack that disabled GNSS in Britain would cost about £1 billion every day the system was down, the report said.

The jamming, blocking, or spoofing of GNSS signals by the Russian government is “more indiscriminate and persistent, larger in scope, and more geographically diverse than previous public reporting suggested,” according to the Weekly Intelligence Summary from Digital Shadows, a cyber security monitoring service.

Nearly 10,000 incidents of ships being sent bad location data

The C4AD study says:

  • 1,311 civilian ships have been affected.
  • 9,883 incidents were reported or detected.

Until the last couple of years, C4AD believed the Russians used GNSS jamming or spoofing mostly to disguise the whereabouts of President Putin.

For instance, a large area over Cape Idokopas, near Gelendzhik on the Black Sea coast of Russia, appears to be within a permanent GNSS spoofing zone. The cape is believed to be Putin’s summer home, or dacha. It contains a vast and lavish private residence: “a large Italianate palace, several helicopter pads, an amphitheatre, and a small port,” C4AD says. It is the only private home in Russia that enjoys the same level of airspace protection and GNSS interference as the Kremlin.

“Russian forces had developed mobile GNSS jamming units to provide protection for the Russian president”

“The geographical placement of the spoofing incidents closely aligns with places where Vladimir Putin was making overseas and domestic visits, suggesting that Russian forces had developed mobile GNSS jamming units to provide protection for the Russian president. The incidents also align with the locations of Russian military and government resources. Although in some areas the motive was likely to restrict access to or obstruct foreign military,” according to Digital Shadows.

Ships sailing near Gelendzhik have reported receiving bogus navigation data on their satellite systems. “In June 2017, the captain of the merchant vessel Atria provided direct evidence of GNSS spoofing activities off the coast of Gelendzhik, Russia, when the vessel’s on-board navigation systems indicated it was located in the middle of the Gelendzhik Airport, about 20km away. More than two dozen other vessels reported similar disruptions in the region on that day,” C4AD says.

An $80 million superyacht was sent off-course by a device the size of a briefcase

Most of the incidents have been recorded in Crimea, the Black Sea, Syria, and Russia.

Perhaps more disturbingly, GNSS spoofing equipment is available to almost anyone, for just a few hundred dollars.

“In the summer of 2013, a research team from The University of Texas at Austin (UT) successfully hijacked the GPS navigation systems onboard an $80 million superyacht using a $2,000 device the size of a small briefcase. The experimental attack forced the ship’s navigation systems to relay false positioning information to the vessel’s captain, who subsequently made slight course corrections to keep the ship seemingly on track,” C4AD reported.

Since then the cost of a GNSS spoofing device has fallen to about $300, C4AD says, and some people have been using them to cheat at Pokemon Go.

Read the whole story
· · · ·

4:41 AM 4/14/2019 – Editorial: Looking into surveillance – Opinion – providencejournal.com Sunday April 14th, 2019 at 5:38 AM

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Editorial: Looking into surveillance – Opinion – providencejournal.com – Sunday April 14th, 2019 at 5:38 AM

Editorial: Looking into surveillance – Opinion – providencejournal.com

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The bitter partisanship that dominates Washington erupted again last week after Attorney General William Barr told a Senate panel that he thought “spying did occur” on Donald Trump’s presidential campaign and that he is looking into the matter.
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi accused him of putting his devotion to the president above his loyalty to the nation. Senator Minority Leader Chuck Schumer demanded that Mr. Barr “retract his statement immediately,” arguing, “Perpetuating conspiracy theories is beneath the office of the attorney general.”
Sen. Brian Schatz, D-Hawaii, said that Mr. Barr’s comment was “unnecessarily inflammatory” and “could cause everybody in the cable news ecosystem to freak out.” The Washington Post accused him of mouthing President Trump’s “talking points.”
The level of distrust seems to be off the charts.
But perhaps we can all step back, take a deep breath and agree on one thing: the protections of individual liberty built into the Constitution and its Bill of Rights are a good thing. If our government has improperly used its immense power to spy on citizens for political purposes, it is vital that it be stopped, and those involved be punished, lest we become a police state.
That’s a big “if,” of course, as the attorney general made clear in his testimony.
“I am not saying improper surveillance occurred. I am saying I am concerned about it, and I am looking into it,” he said.
“Yes, I think spying did occur. The question is whether it was adequately predicated” — meaning, whether top Obama intelligence officials were legally justified in surveilling the communications and activities of members of the presidential campaign of the opposing party. For obvious reasons, the government’s intelligence agencies are not supposed to cross that bright red line causally.
“I think spying on a political campaign is a big deal,” Mr. Barr said. “I feel that I have an obligation to ensure government power was not abused.”
He is waiting for the Justice Department inspector general, Michael Horowitz, to report on the use of warrants issued by a secret court for the investigations.
We view President Trump with immense skepticism and consider his bad policies, mercurial behavior and freewheeling pronouncements to be damaging to the nation and demeaning to his high office. We proudly endorsed his opponent, Hillary Clinton.
All the same, it is unnerving that former leading intelligence officials who should scrupulously stand above politics have been bitterly partisan in their texts, tweets, books and cable TV gigs. Given the immense powers of the government to probe citizens, particularly in the digital age, it is absolutely essential that our intelligence agencies not be weaponized for political use.
Though a big GOP campaign contributor, Mr. Barr does not seem to be an obvious hothead. A well-off 68-year-old with round glasses and a deadpan expression, he has long been regarded as a careful lawyer and a member in good standing of the Washington establishment, having formerly served as attorney general under President George H.W. Bush.
Whether he will fairly explore what led to government surveillance of members of his boss’s campaign team remains to be seen.
But certainly this matter is something that the country’s top justice official should look into, whether that affects the ecosystem of cable news or not.
Read the whole story
· · · · · · · ·

Unredacted report needed

1 Share
Meanwhile, Trump’s claiming, based on Barr’s summary, that he is … So is phoning Putin’s buddy, al Bashir, to warn him that we were going to bomb …

OP-ED: Mueller Report likely won’t flatter Trump

1 Share
After Trump fired FBI Director James Comey over “this Russia thing,” Rosenstein appointed Robert Mueller, a lifelong Republican and a man with an …

“Rudy Giuliani” – Google News: Terrorist label is a convenient pretext for military intervention – Frederick News Post

1 Share
Terrorist label is a convenient pretext for military intervention  Frederick News Post

For the first time in history, the United States has designated a military unit of a foreign country as a terrorist group.

 “Rudy Giuliani” – Google News

“trump electorate” – Google News: Editorial: Release Trump’s tax returns | News, Sports, Jobs – Lawrence Journal-World

1 Share
Editorial: Release Trump’s tax returns | News, Sports, Jobs  Lawrence Journal-World

Republicans may be right that efforts by Congressional Democrats to force the release of President Donald Trump’s tax returns may open a big can of worms.

 “trump electorate” – Google News

Read the whole story
· · · · · · · ·

surveillance – Google Search

1 Share
Image result for surveillance

Editorial: Looking into surveillance – Opinion – providencejournal.com

1 Share

The bitter partisanship that dominates Washington erupted again last week after Attorney General William Barr told a Senate panel that he thought “spying did occur” on Donald Trump’s presidential campaign and that he is looking into the matter.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi accused him of putting his devotion to the president above his loyalty to the nation. Senator Minority Leader Chuck Schumer demanded that Mr. Barr “retract his statement immediately,” arguing, “Perpetuating conspiracy theories is beneath the office of the attorney general.”

Sen. Brian Schatz, D-Hawaii, said that Mr. Barr’s comment was “unnecessarily inflammatory” and “could cause everybody in the cable news ecosystem to freak out.” The Washington Post accused him of mouthing President Trump’s “talking points.”

The level of distrust seems to be off the charts.

But perhaps we can all step back, take a deep breath and agree on one thing: the protections of individual liberty built into the Constitution and its Bill of Rights are a good thing. If our government has improperly used its immense power to spy on citizens for political purposes, it is vital that it be stopped, and those involved be punished, lest we become a police state.

That’s a big “if,” of course, as the attorney general made clear in his testimony.

“I am not saying improper surveillance occurred. I am saying I am concerned about it, and I am looking into it,” he said.

“Yes, I think spying did occur. The question is whether it was adequately predicated” — meaning, whether top Obama intelligence officials were legally justified in surveilling the communications and activities of members of the presidential campaign of the opposing party. For obvious reasons, the government’s intelligence agencies are not supposed to cross that bright red line causally.

“I think spying on a political campaign is a big deal,” Mr. Barr said. “I feel that I have an obligation to ensure government power was not abused.”

He is waiting for the Justice Department inspector general, Michael Horowitz, to report on the use of warrants issued by a secret court for the investigations.

We view President Trump with immense skepticism and consider his bad policies, mercurial behavior and freewheeling pronouncements to be damaging to the nation and demeaning to his high office. We proudly endorsed his opponent, Hillary Clinton.

All the same, it is unnerving that former leading intelligence officials who should scrupulously stand above politics have been bitterly partisan in their texts, tweets, books and cable TV gigs. Given the immense powers of the government to probe citizens, particularly in the digital age, it is absolutely essential that our intelligence agencies not be weaponized for political use.

Though a big GOP campaign contributor, Mr. Barr does not seem to be an obvious hothead. A well-off 68-year-old with round glasses and a deadpan expression, he has long been regarded as a careful lawyer and a member in good standing of the Washington establishment, having formerly served as attorney general under President George H.W. Bush.

Whether he will fairly explore what led to government surveillance of members of his boss’s campaign team remains to be seen.

But certainly this matter is something that the country’s top justice official should look into, whether that affects the ecosystem of cable news or not.

Read the whole story
· ·

Unredacted report needed

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Meanwhile, Trump’s claiming, based on Barr’s summary, that he is … So is phoning Putin’s buddy, al Bashir, to warn him that we were going to bomb …

OP-ED: Mueller Report likely won’t flatter Trump

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After Trump fired FBI Director James Comey over “this Russia thing,” Rosenstein appointed Robert Mueller, a lifelong Republican and a man with an …
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“Rudy Giuliani” – Google News: Terrorist label is a convenient pretext for military intervention – Frederick News Post

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Terrorist label is a convenient pretext for military intervention  Frederick News PostFor the first time in history, the United States has designated a military unit of a foreign country as a terrorist group.

 “Rudy Giuliani” – Google News

“trump electorate” – Google News: Editorial: Release Trump’s tax returns | News, Sports, Jobs – Lawrence Journal-World

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Editorial: Release Trump’s tax returns | News, Sports, Jobs  Lawrence Journal-WorldRepublicans may be right that efforts by Congressional Democrats to force the release of President Donald Trump’s tax returns may open a big can of worms.

 “trump electorate” – Google News

Donald Trump | The Guardian: Palestinians eye Israel’s election: ‘People could make peace … the problem is politicians’

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Palestinians hoped for change, but a lurch to the right in Israel’s elections has only brought despairFor as long as she can remember, Mary Giacaman, a Christian Palestinian, has watched the outcome of the Israeli election on TV. “But not this year,” she explained. “It was too depressing, and anyway I knew what would happen.”

This Holy Week, the 56-year-old Catholic will be attending mass each morning as usual at Bethlehem’s Church of the Nativity across the square from her olive wood carved souvenir shop; she will spend a festive Easter day with her sons, daughters and six grandchildren. If nothing else, it will be a welcome distraction from a “very bad” election result, which saw a decisive victory for prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

Continue reading…

 Donald Trump | The Guardian

Where the investigations related to President Trump stand – ABC News

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Where the investigations related to President Trump stand  ABC NewsWhere investigations related to President Donald Trump stand and what may lie ahead for him: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW TODAY: A top House Democrat on …

“trump investigated by the fbi” – Google News: Harry Litman: Barr’s testimony was a terrible self-inflicted wound – Valley Town Crier

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Harry Litman: Barr’s testimony was a terrible self-inflicted wound  Valley Town CrierOne of the most frequently used words, including by me, to describe William Barr when he was nominated for attorney general was “institutionalist.”Barr himself …

 “trump investigated by the fbi” – Google News

“fbi criticism” – Google News: Harry Litman: Barr’s testimony was a terrible self-inflicted wound – Valley Town Crier

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Harry Litman: Barr’s testimony was a terrible self-inflicted wound  Valley Town CrierOne of the most frequently used words, including by me, to describe William Barr when he was nominated for attorney general was “institutionalist.”Barr himself …

 “fbi criticism” – Google News


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