Вести.Ru: Пусан конфисковал российское судно Seagrand и отдал его корейским морякам

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Власти Пусана конфисковали российское судно Seagrand, которое зимой врезалось в мост. Сообщается, что теперь судно использует корейский экипаж. Судебное заседание по делу против капитана Seagrand назначено на 23 апреля.

Download video: https://redirect.vgtrk.com/go/video2/1885584

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Вести.Ru


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Voice of America: Ban on Foreign Landowners Leaves Georgia Farmers in Limbo

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When Georgian businesswoman Tamar Gerliani planted grapes on a small piece of land to start her own winery three years ago, she knew she faced an uphill battle in an industry dominated by men.

But she could not have foreseen that a legal reform designed to help Georgian landowners would make things even harder.

A ban on foreigners owning farmland introduced last year in Georgia’s new constitution has made it more difficult for farmers to borrow because the country’s mostly foreign-owned banks will no longer accept it as collateral.

Small farmers thwarted

That has thwarted hundreds of small farmers looking to expand, banking associations, farmers and pressure groups say — among them Gerliani, who needs $10,000 for a tractor to tend her vines.

“It’s difficult to work without a tractor,” the 31-year-old told the Thomson Reuters Foundation. “This business already has many challenges and I could do without having to go ask around every time I need to use it.”

The new constitution states that, with a small number of exceptions, agricultural land can only be owned by the state, a Georgian citizen or a Georgian-owned entity.

The provision came into force in December last year as the former Soviet republic swore in a new president, though there has been a de-facto ban on foreigners buying farmland since 2017, when the government imposed a moratorium on purchases.

It followed widespread public concern about outsiders scooping up too much of the country’s fertile soil, particularly in strategically sensitive areas, said Agriculture Minister Levan Davitashvili.

About 40% of Georgia’s population lives in rural areas, but less than 10% of the country’s land is arable, and foreigners own about 10% of it, he said.

“Most of our agricultural land is pastures located in high mountainous areas,” Davitashvili told the Thomson Reuters Foundation by phone. “People were a bit concerned and this … was reflected in the constitution.”

Bad effect on common people

But the ban is damaging small farmers, who often have no other collateral, said Teona Zakarashvili, a lawyer at anti-corruption watchdog Transparency International.

“This type of regulation has a bad effect on common people. It directly impacts the livelihood of small farmers who already are in a very poor financial state,” she said.

Since the moratorium came into force, about 1,500 loans were denied, according to the parliamentary committee on agrarian issues.

Women in particularly have been badly affected. They often have no other property because sons are traditionally favored when it comes to inheritance, said Nino Zambakhidze, who heads the Georgian Farmers Association.

Loving wine

Gerliani’s grandfather left her one hectare (2.5 acres) of land in Kakheti, the main wine-producing region of a country widely regarded as the birthplace of winemaking.

Her family, like many others in the area, had been producing small quantities of wine for generations, but as she grew up she began dreaming of turning it into a business.

After studying marketing online, she took up winemaking classes and used her spare time to work on her dream, a wine label called Malati, the word for love in the Svan language spoken in Georgia’s mountains.

She invested savings and planted Saperavi, the grapes used to make Georgia’s best known wine, a full-bodied red.

Georgian wines went into decline under the Soviet Union, when many wineries fell under state control.

But it is now enjoying a resurgence: Last year, the country exported a record 86 million bottles, according to the Georgian National Wine Agency.

After a few years of hard work Gerliani is expecting to produce up to 3,000 bottles of organic wine with her next harvest in autumn.

But the journey was not an easy one.

At first, she said, almost no one took her seriously.

“It’s not easy to start as a woman,” she said. “Men think they are more professional and know much more about this business than women do.”

Most people assumed she had no idea what she was up to, and whenever she needed equipment or workers she found herself quizzed over her winemaking credentials.

That was one of the reasons she was so keen to buy her own tractor. But with only her vineyard as collateral, she has been unable to do so.

Solutions

Davitashvili, the agriculture minister, said the government was aware of the problems faced by small farmers like Gerliani and was looking as possible solutions.

They include allowing financial institutions to own agricultural land for up to two years, after which they must sell it.

A draft law would also allow foreigners to own land if they inherit it or have an investment plan approved by the government. Those failing to use it for agriculture however would be forced to sell it.

Davitashvili said he hoped the law would be approved before the beginning of the summer.

Meanwhile, tractor or no tractor, Gerliani is determined to make it.

“It’s really hard but I manage,” she said. “I am doing my best.”

Voice of America


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NYT > Europe: Your Wednesday Briefing

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A view of the damaged roof of Notre-Dame on Tuesday, in the aftermath of the devastating fire.

NYT > Europe


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golosamerikius’s YouTube Videos: Любой ценой пробраться к президенту

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From: golosamerikius
Duration: 03:11

Юг Флориды второй месяц подряд становится местом действия возможных китайских шпионских историй. На этот раз под пристальное внимание спецслужб попала 33-летняя гражданка Поднебесной Юйцзин Чжан
Оригинальное видео: https://www.golos-ameriki.ru/a/4878473.html

golosamerikius’s YouTube Videos


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Global Voices: Indian voters undeterred by missing names from electoral lists and violent clashes

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High voter turnouts have set the momentum for the elections

EVM used in the 2019 India general elections – Besides every candidate’s name and party symbol on the Electronic Voting Machine (EVM), there is a blue button. Screenshot from YouTube Video by LatestLY.

On the 14th of April 2019, the world’s largest democracy voted into an election for seats at the Lok Sabha, the Lower House of India’s Parliament. This election is crucial as it will determine the identity of the governing political party, and ultimately of the Prime Minister of India. The 36 various Indian states and territories that make the Union of India are invited to vote in several phases, each entitled to a different number of seats based on their size. The ones voting in this first phase were Lok Sabha constituencies from Andhra Pradesh with 25 seats, Telangana with 17 seats, and Uttarakhand with 5 seats. Arunachal Pradesh, Jammu and Kashmir and Meghalaya also entered this first phase of elections, with two constituency seats each being up for voting. Finally Manipur, Mizoram, Nagaland, Sikkim, Tripura, Chhattisgarh, Andaman and Nicobar and Lakshadweep voted for one seat each, while seven seats were available for Maharashtra. A total of 91 constituencies went into this first phase.

Read: All you need to know about India’s 2019 general elections.

On the first day of the election, the voter turnout in some states was seen to be high, with Northeastern Tripura registering a maximum voter turnout of 81.8 percent for its one constituency. Jammu and Kashmir recorded a voter turnout of 54.4 percent for its two constituencies, 50 percent was recorded in Bihar for its four constituencies, Uttarakhand witnessed 57.8 percent, Telangana saw a turnout of 60 percent and Andhra Pradesh had a 66 percent of voter turnout. The key state of Uttar Pradesh with the highest constituency recorded a voter turnout of 64 percent.

The election commission declared that barring a few incidents, the voting went on peacefully. There were however a few incidents that hampered with the citizens’ right to vote.

Andhra Pradesh reported of a violent clash and faulty Electronic Voting Machines (EVM) that obstructed the entire election momentum and left 2 dead and 4 others injured.

The two main political parties that clashed in Andhra Pradesh, were Telugu Desam Party and YSR Congress Party. The voting took a violent turn when the YSRC accused TDP of rigging the EVMs. As many voters reported faulty EVMs, both parties started the blame game. The situation escalated and led to clashes that were witnessed in Kotha Veerapuram and in T Sadum villages. In Veerapuram, police had to resort to lathi charge to disperse the mob, while additional police force was brought in to control the situation. The clash ended tragically: local political leaders Chinta Bhaskar Reddy from TDP and K Pulla Reddy of YSRC died succumbing to severe injuries. According to a report by New Indian express, an a online news site, a booth-level worker of YSRC also died in T Sadum village.

Andhra Pradesh was not the only state that witnessed disruptions. Improvised explosive device (IED) explosives were detonated in the Gadchiroli district of Maharashtra. This area has a history of Naxal clashes and two IEDs were detonated, one on Wednesday which was a day prior to the voting, and on the day of the voting. On the day prior to the voting, the IED explosive was detonated when a polling party was visiting the polling booth with the Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) providing security.

A CRPF Jawan sustained injuries according to a report. On the day of election, another device was detonated about 150 metres from the polling booth where people were queuing up to vote. No casualties were reported.

In Hyderabad, the capital of the centre-south Indian state of Telangana, many voters were turned down at the polling booths as their names were not to be found in the voting list. The voters felt deprived to exercise their right and were sent back. Some of them included executives from the corporate world such as Shobana Kamineni Vice Chairperson of Apollo Hospital, and RC Bhargava Chairman of Maruti Suzuki.

Arvind Kejriwal, the Chief Minister of Delhi, tweeted:

Apart from those incidents, the voter turnout seemed to have set the momentum for the elections. West Bengal also reported the highest voter turnout with 81 percent. Andhra Pradesh had voting booths open till late due to faulty EVMs slowing down the process. Across all the constituencies, more than 50 percent of eligible voters cast their vote. Citizens of the country partook in various initiatives to encourage others to vote. Some took to Twitter to encourage more voters.

In the state of Tamil Nadu, people even formed a human chain in order to encourage more voters to cast their vote.

The next phase of election starts on April 18, to be followed by several others phases from April 23, April 29, May 6, May 12 and May 19, as India awaits to see who gets selected as the Prime Minister of India. The counting of the votes is to be done on May 23.

Global Voices


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RT – Daily news: ‘Chilling message to all critics’: HRW slams Israel’s decision to deport its regional director

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Preview An Israeli court has upheld the deportation order against the local director of Human Rights Watch, accusing him of supporting the BDS movement by condoning Airbnb’s decision to briefly take down Jewish listings in the West Bank.
Read Full Article at RT.com

RT – Daily news


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ЛІГА.Новости: Зеленский обречен: почему ему лучше не становиться президентом

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Украинцы хотят от Зеленского снижения тарифов и посадок топ-коррупционеров. Как это у него нет таких полномочий? Ганьба, давайте следующего президента

ЛІГА.Новости


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