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Window on Eurasia — New Series: Russians and Ukrainians have Common Enemy in Union of the Two Dictators, Satarov Says


Paul Goble
            Staunton, September 10 – “Two aging dictators have come together to create a union” based on their common fear of their two peoples and to try to ensure their own survival, Gyorgy Satarov says. The Russian and Belarusian peoples should unite against this common two-headed enemy, Vladimir Putin and Alyaksandr Lukashenka.
            These two dictators whom others by habit or fear call presidents are prepared to do anything up to and including murder to retain power. They don’t like one another, but they fear their peoples even more because they know that if they lose power, they are likely to lose more than that, the Moscow commentator says (newsru.com/blog/10sep2020/pronas.html).
            We, the two peoples who live in “two countries from Brest to Khabarovsk, are treated by both as if we were their personal property rather than human beings and citizens with inalienable rights.  Today, the two dictators are focusing on Belarus because the people there are in the streets, but they will turn on Russia whenever threatened – and upcoming elections will do that.
            Each of them still has significant coercive resources, Satarov continues; but “they are doomed.” Their end cannot come soon enough, but it is important that one or both of them don’t play divide and rule policies against us.  They have formed a union of dictators against the people. The two nations must form a union of peoples against dictators.
            Tragically, Russians are largely silent about Putin’s plans to move in Belarus in support of Lukashenka, the commentator says, reminding his readers that “silence in Russia now is no less bestial than the crimes of these dictators for it covers their criminal behavior.” And it is absurd because Russians are as angry as the Belarusians.
            Putin must be shown that this is the case, and the best way to do that is to vote against all of his candidates in the upcoming elections.   “All of us must take part and vote against his party and his candidates.” And we must urge others to follow out lead. “Putin must know that we are doing this every day.”
            And he must know something else, Satarov says. He must come to recognize that “on the streets of the cities of Belarus, we are present as well because we love the Belarusians, celebrate them, and the devil take it, envy” their courage and their willingness to stand up to dictators, their own and ours.
            “Aleksey Navalny has come out of the coma” Putin’s poisons put him in, Satarov concludes. “It is time for us to come out of ours as well.”

Window on Eurasia — New Series