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The Russia News

August 19, 2022 6:46 am

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Voice of America – English: House Likely to Offer Articles of Impeachment Against Trump on Monday


Efforts to hold President Donald Trump accountable for his role in inciting the mob that overran the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday gained momentum Saturday, with Democratic members of the U.S. House of Representatives announcing they will offer articles of impeachment as early as Monday.

Rep. Ted Lieu, a Democrat from the state of California, who helped draft the charges against Trump, tweeted Saturday afternoon that the articles had 180 co-sponsors, although no Republicans were among them.

Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives Nancy Pelosi and her colleagues are anxious to see the president removed from office before his term ends Jan. 20, even though the Republican-led U.S. Senate is unlikely to agree.

“The situation of this unhinged president could not be more dangerous, and we must do everything that we can to protect the American people from his unbalanced assault on our country and our democracy,” Pelosi said Friday.

If the House were to impeach the president, for a second time, that would trigger a trial in the Senate, which has acquitted Trump once before and is to be in recess until Jan. 19. Democrats will take control of the Senate later this month.

Democratic congressional leaders also have called on Vice President Mike Pence to invoke the 25th Amendment, which offers an alternative and perhaps quicker way to remove the president from office. Pence has not responded but has reportedly told colleagues he does not favor such action.

Passed in the 1960s, the 25th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution allows for the temporary transfer of power from the president to the vice president if the president is incapacitated, with the approval of a majority of the Cabinet. But analysts say that option could be difficult to exercise with just days left in Trump’s presidency.

District of Columbia National Guardsmen stand outside the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, after a day of rioting Trump supporters.

“It’s also very difficult in a situation in which the president is not in a coma or not otherwise physically incapacitated that he can’t function or operate because under the 25th Amendment, once it is invoked the president can notify Congress that he is able to discharge the powers of the office and take that power back,” said John Hudak, a senior fellow in governance studies at the Brookings Institution.

An overwhelming number of Democratic lawmakers – and some Republicans – have expressed support for removing Trump from power or censuring his actions.

Sen. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska has called for Trump to resign, making her the first Republican senator to endorse a presidential resignation.

“I want him to resign,” she told The Anchorage Daily News. “I want him out. He has caused enough damage.”

“He hasn’t been focused on what is going on with COVID,” Murkowski said. “He’s either been golfing, or he’s been inside the Oval Office fuming and throwing every single person who has been loyal and faithful to him under the bus, starting with the vice president. … He needs to get out.”

Pennsylvania Sen. Pat Toomey declined Saturday on Fox News to commit to voting in favor of Trumps removal despite saying he had “committed impeachable offenses.” However, Nebraska Sen. Ben Sasse told CBS News that he would definitely consider impeachment.

But House Republican Leader Kevin McCarthy indicated he does not support impeachment.

President-elect Joe Biden has said Trump wasn’t fit for office, but he declined to endorse Democratic calls that he be impeached for a second time. Biden said the situation would be different if Trump were not leaving office in less than two weeks.

“If we were six months out, we should be doing everything to get him out of office. Impeaching him again, trying to evoke the 25th Amendment, whatever it took,” Biden said. “But I am focused now on us taking control as president and vice president on the 20th and to get our agenda moving as quickly as we can.”

Trump was impeached on charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress in December 2019 but was acquitted in a trial in the U.S. Senate in February 2020. No American president has ever faced two impeachment votes.

“There are two reasons to pursue impeachment,” said Paul Berman, a professor of law at the George Washington University School of Law. “One is simply to make it clear that a sitting president inciting an insurrection against the United States government is perhaps the worst thing that a president could ever possibly do. And that statement needs to be made. Second, and more pragmatically, if he were impeached, and convicted, that would prevent him from running for office in the future.”

Voice of America – English


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Voice of America – English: Frances Lee on Political Bipartisanship


Host Carol Castiel and Caroline Haubenstricker speak with Frances E. Lee, professor of politics and public affairs at Princeton University about her new book: “The Limits of Party: Congress and Lawmaking in a Polarized Era.” Lee tells VOA that extensive research shows that divided government, i.e., when one political party holds the executive branch and the other controls one or both chambers of Congress, can produce meaningful bipartisan legislation. Lee reacts to the Democrats’ narrow control of both the Senate and the House of Representatives and what it means for President-elect Joe Biden’s legislative agenda.

Download audio: https://voamedia.voanews.com/pd/p/2446332/sp/244633200/serveFlavor/entryId/1_oo0r0u93/v/1/ev/2/flavorId/1_kt90zh0h/fileName/A_Conversation_with_Frances_Lee_on_Political_Bipartisanship_(VOA_MP3_128Kbps).mp3/name/a.mp3

Voice of America – English


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Voice of America – English: Nationwide Power Blackout Hits Pakistan


Pakistan was hit by a massive power blackout early Sunday, officials said, with much of the country, including all major cities, plunged into darkness.

The electricity distribution system in the nation of more than 210 million people is a complex — and delicate — web, and a problem in one section of the grid can lead to cascading breakdowns countrywide.

The latest blackout was caused by a fault in southern Pakistan at 11:41 pm local time Saturday (1841 GMT), power minister Omar Ayub Khan tweeted, citing preliminary reports.

“The fault tripped the transmission system of the country… leading to the shutdown of power plants,” Khan said.

The blackout hit all of Pakistan’s major cities, including the capital Islamabad, economic hub Karachi and the second-largest city Lahore.

The Ministry of Energy said that power had been restored in some parts of the country, and that teams were still working on restoring supply completely in the early hours of Sunday.

Netblocks, which monitors internet outages said internet connectivity in the country “collapsed” as a result of the outage.

Connectivity was at “62 percent of ordinary levels,” it said in a tweet.

In 2015 an apparent rebel attack on a key power line plunged around 80 % of Pakistan into darkness.

That blackout, one of the worst in Pakistan’s history, caused electricity to be cut in major cities nationwide, including the capital Islamabad, and even affected one of the country’s international airports.

Voice of America – English


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Voice of America – English: Trump Supporters Storm U.S. Capitol


Issues in the News moderator Dan Raviv, Columnist for Newsday with panelists Josh Glancy, Washington Bureau Chief for the Sunday Times and Ashraf Khalil, Washington, Metro Reporter for the Associated Press deliberate the latest top stories of the week including a mob of supporters of President Donald Trump stormed the U.S. Capitol as members of Congress were in the process of certifying President-elect Joe Biden’s victory.

Download audio: https://voamedia.voanews.com/pd/p/2446332/sp/244633200/serveFlavor/entryId/1_rfaicnzl/v/1/ev/2/flavorId/1_4pwcr8lc/fileName/Trump_Supporters_Storm_U.S._Capitol_(VOA_MP3_128Kbps).mp3/name/a.mp3

Voice of America – English


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Voice of America – English: VOA Newscasts


Voice of America – English


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Voice of America – English: VOA Newscasts (2 Minute)


Voice of America – English


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Voice of America – English: Pro-Trump State Lawmaker Resigns After Riot; More Arrests Announced


A pro-Trump state lawmaker who filmed himself storming the U.S. Capitol has resigned and more arrests were announced Saturday as part of an investigation into Wednesday’s attack on the Capitol.

Derrick Evans, a Republican member of the West Virginia House of Delegates, announced his resignation Saturday in a one-sentence letter to West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice.

Evans was charged with entering a restricted area on the Capitol grounds and disorderly conduct. If convicted, he faces a year and a half in federal prison. Evans broadcast a Facebook Live video of himself breaking into the building with a crowd of rioters, at one point saying, “We’re in, we’re in, baby.” In an earlier video posted on Facebook, now deleted, Evans warned that the rioters would storm the building.

Evans has since said he wanted to apologize, according to media reports.

Richard Barnett, 60, of Little Rock, Arkansas, was arrested Friday morning and charged with entering the office of Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, where photos show him sitting in Pelosi’s office with his boot up on a desk. He faces three counts: knowingly entering and remaining in restricted grounds; violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds; and theft of public money, property or records, according to court documents released Friday. Barnett, who faces up to one year in prison, is in custody in Arkansas awaiting extradition to Washington.

Jacob Anthony Chansley, who appeared in numerous photos and videos wearing a fur hat with horns and paint on his face, was arrested Saturday and faces charges including violent entry and disorderly conduct on the U.S. Capitol grounds. Chansley is scheduled to appear in court next week, Assistant U.S. Attorney Esther Winne told The Associated Press by email. Chansley did not immediately respond to messages.

Supporters of President Donald Trump enter the US Capitol, Jan. 6, 2021, in Washington, D.C.

Doug Jensen, 41, of Des Moines, Iowa, was jailed early Saturday on federal charges, including trespassing and disorderly conduct counts, for his alleged role in the Capitol riot. Video posted online during the storming of the Capitol showed a man who appears to be Jensen, who is white, pursuing a Black police officer up an interior flight of stairs as a mob of people trails several steps behind. At several points, the officer says, “Get back,” to no avail. It is not known if Jensen has an attorney.

Evans and Barnett are among those charged so far in federal court in the District of Columbia in connection with the rioting. The charges were filed Thursday and unsealed Friday. In addition, about 40 others were charged in the D.C. Superior Court, most of them for illegal entry and curfew violations.

Adam Johnson, 36, of Florida was arrested late Friday in Pinellas County, Florida, where he remains in custody on a U.S. Marshals warrant, according to jail records.  A man who appears to be Johnson was seen in a viral photo carrying the House Speaker’s lectern through the Capitol. The charges against him were not known.

Among those charged in federal court, Lonnie Coffman, a 70-year-old Alabama resident, was charged with possession of an unregistered firearm and carrying a pistol without a license. Inside his truck parked behind the Capitol, police on Wednesday found 11 Molotov cocktails that an official said “would essentially constitute homemade napalm.”

FBI Director Christopher Wray said that the charges announced so far “are just the beginning of the FBI’s ongoing efforts to hold those responsible” for Wednesday’s rioting accountable.

“We will continue to aggressively investigate each and every individual who chose to ignore the law and instead incite violence, destroy property and injure others,” Wray said in a statement.

Ken Kohl, the first assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia, said the Justice Department has assigned hundreds of prosecutors and agents to what he described as an active, fluid, 24/7 investigation. Working out of three command centers, the investigators are combing surveillance videos and social media images to identify and track down the rioters.

“The department will spare no resources in our efforts to hold all of these people accountable, and it’s going to be something that we’ll be continuing to work on in the coming hours, days and weeks as we pursue this investigation,” Kohl told reporters on a press call.

Richard Barnett, a supporter of President Donald Trump, sits inside the office of US Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi as he protests inside the US Capitol in Washington, D.C., Jan. 6, 2021.

The rioting and looting erupted Wednesday afternoon when hundreds of supporters of President Donald Trump, angry over Trump’s loss to Joe Biden in the Nov. 3 election, forced their way into the building that contains the House and Senate while lawmakers were meeting in a joint session to certify Biden’s victory.

In a video released late Thursday, Trump condemned the violence and called for healing.

For weeks Trump has falsely claimed that he won the election in a landslide but was robbed of his victory – a claim believed by many of his followers. During a rally near the White House on Wednesday, Trump urged thousands of his supporters to march to the Capitol to protest the election results.

Asked if federal prosecutors were examining Trump’s role in inciting the assault on the Capitol, Michael Sherwin, the acting U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia, told reporters Thursday, “We’re looking at all actors here, and anyone that had a role and the evidence fits the elements of a crime, they’re going to be charged.”

The subsequent violence left five dead including a Capitol Police officer.

Law enforcement officials said they were investigating the circumstances leading up to the officer’s death but would not say whether they were pursuing a murder case. 

Voice of America – English


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News: Donald Trump expected to travel to US-Mexico border to laud work on wall


News


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RSS: Новый набор научной роты ВКС в Воронеже продолжит работу над развитием беспилотной авиации


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RSS: Более 50 единиц техники получили специалисты связи ЦВО в 2020 году


Новые машины позволяют устанавливать связь по закрытым интернет-каналам и осуществлять топографическую привязку через различные спутниковые системы.

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