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Reactions to the death of former Pakistan President Musharraf

2023-02-05T08:44:23Z

(Reuters) -Following are reactions to the death on Sunday of former Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf:

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FILE PHOTO: Pakistan’s President Pervez Musharraf arrives to meet Britain’s Prime Minister Gordon Brown in Downing Street in London January 28, 2008. REUTERS/Stephen Hird

FAWAD CHAUDHRY, A FORMER MUSHARRAF AIDE AND CURRENTLY A SENIOR LEADER OF FORMER PRIME MINISTER IMRAN KHAN’S PARTY

“He is called a military dictator, but there has never been a stronger democratic system than that under him… Pervez Musharraf led Pakistan at a very difficult time, and Pakistanis believe the era of his reign was one of the best in Pakistan’s history.”

“Once an implacable foe of India, he became a real force for peace 2002-2007. I met him annually in those days at the UN & found him smart, engaging & clear in his strategic thinking. RIP”

MALEEHA LODHI, AMBASSADOR TO THE UNITED STATES 1999-2002, TOLD REUTERS

“General Musharraf faced many challenges but of them the three crisis he navigated with much prudence were the aftermath of 9/11, the year-long Indian military mobilisation on the border with Pakistan and the AQ Khan affair.”

MOSHARRAF ZAIDI, CEO OF TABADLAD, AN ISLAMABAD-BASED THINK TANK

“The most important legacy Gen. Musharraf leaves behind predates his time as president. It was his planning and execution of the Kargil War (against India) – against the judgement of military officers that preceded him and initially unbeknownst to the elected leaders at the time. The 1999 Kargil War permanently altered … Pakistan.”

“This was the infamous army chief who sold off the country’s honor and respect, Dr. Aafia Siddiqui (may Allah bless her) by handing her over to the United States for a few dollars, a dark chapter of selling daughters was created in history.”

Tehreek-E-Taliban is an umbrella organization of various Islamist armed militant groups operating along the Afghan–Pakistani border.

Aafia Siddiqui is a Pakistani neuroscientist who is serving an 86-year U.S. prison sentence on a 2010 conviction for shooting at soldiers and FBI agents.